Making a Cover for a Dressform

Did you ever wonder how to make a cover for a dressform? I did, and every idea I found was more complicated than the other. This is as easy as it can get.

Did you ever wonder how to make a cover for a dressform? I did, and every idea I found was more complicated than the other. This is as easy as it can get.

Her name is Bertha, and she came in the mail last week. Bertha and I have a something in common, like dress size. Though I’d like to think that I have a good head over my shoulders.

I always wanted to have a friend like Bertha, to sew some nice clothes together and play dress-up. But friends like Bertha are expensive, so when I found I could have her for less than $100 plus shipping, I decided it was time.

Did you ever wonder how to make a cover for a dressform? I did, and every idea I found was more complicated than the other. This is as easy as it can get.

This is Bertha when she came to me. She’s an adjustable dress form, a very basic one. She’s no pinnable (bummer), and is covered in some ugly gray flannel on top of her plastic frame. You can see the gaps where the adjustable plates join, on top of that, the gaps are more pronounced after I adjusted her to my size (I am bustier). I needed to do something about it.

The process was simple, and the photos self-explanatory.

Did you ever wonder how to make a cover for a dressform? I did, and every idea I found was more complicated than the other. This is as easy as it can get.

1. Pin some stretchy fabric (Jersey or ribbed knit works best) along side join, stretching as needed. Then mark the cutting line between the pins. Cut piece. Repeat for the back.
2. Join the two pieces with with overcast machine. Serge the hem with looser threads.
3. Pass a thick cotton tread through loops in the hem.
4. Tighten and gather  fabric at the bottom. Tie the threads.

Did you ever wonder how to make a cover for a dressform? I did, and every idea I found was more complicated than the other. This is as easy as it can get.

This is the second cover I made for her, following the same process.

While Bertha is not a pinnable dressform, the two layers fabric (the pink one is underneath) means I can pin fabric to the new cover in a pinch. So it’s not only a matter of looking better.

I can now also wash her cover when necessary, and now that I see how easy this was, I can buy other fabrics and make new covers any time. This may be the easiest DIY cover for a dress form yet.

Bertha hasn’t said anything about her new looks (she’s a shy girl), but I can tell she looks happier. What do you think?

Aunt Clara

Comments

  1. Hello! I know this is a pretty old post now, but this tutorial was exactly what I was looking for and I just wanted to let you know that I think it’s GENIUS that you use the serger threads as a channel for the gathering hem. I’m going to have to try that technique! You should be proud that your work is still inspiring people.

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