Champolas de Tamarindo y Guanabana (Tamarind & Soursop Juices)

Champolas de Tamarindo y Guanabana (Tamarind & Soursop Juices): Delicious with a bit of a sour touch from tamarind and the mild delicate taste of soursop.

One of the things I love the most about our cuisine is the fact that we have a large number of fruits available year around. And we have figured how to make juices from nearly all of them.

Champolas (juices) are natural heat busters, and of those champolas de tamarindo y guanabana (tamarind & soursop juices) are some of the most popular.

Champolas de Tamarindo y Guanabana (Tamarind & Soursop Juices): Delicious with a bit of a sour touch from tamarind and the mild delicate taste of soursop.Champolas de Tamarindo y Guanabana (Tamarind & Soursop Juices): Delicious with a bit of a sour touch from tamarind and the mild delicate taste of soursop.

Tamarind, a fruit related to beans, grows in a brown, hard pod from a large tree. Tamarind is originally from tropical Africa, and has spread to basically wherever it can grow. In the Dominican Republic it is used mostly for juice-making, and appreciated for its refreshing and nutritional quality. Tamarind is rich in vitamin B1, iron and magnesium. It contains small amounts of arsenic, which makes it a sleeping aid without the danger of its toxicity.

It is not grown on an large agricultural scale, rather it is obtained from small producers. The tree is valued for its shade and low maintenance.

Champolas de Tamarindo y Guanabana (Tamarind & Soursop Juices): Delicious with a bit of a sour touch from tamarind and the mild delicate taste of soursop.Champolas de Tamarindo y Guanabana (Tamarind & Soursop Juices): Delicious with a bit of a sour touch from tamarind and the mild delicate taste of soursop.

Soursop (guanábana) is one of our “ancient” fruits, it already grew here when the Spaniards arrived in the island. This meaty, sweet fruit is great whether eaten, or in juices.

Soursop contains significant amounts of vitamin C, vitamin B1 and vitamin B2.

We always had a soursop tree in our backyard, and an immense tamarind tree at my aunt’s house when I was a child. These drinks always remind me of my childhood.

Aunt Clara

Champolas de Tamarindo y Guanabana (Tamarind & Soursop Juices)
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Champolas de Tamarindo y Guanabana (Tamarind & Soursop Juices): Delicious with a bit of a sour touch from tamarind and the mild delicate taste of soursop.
Author:
Serves: 6 porciones
Ingredients
Soursop juice
  • 1 large soursop, peeled and seeded
  • 1 cup of sugar (you may not use it all)
  • Ice
Tamarind juice
  • 3 cups of tamarind pulp (seeded, if possible)
  • 1 cup of sugar (you may not use it all)
  • Ice
Instructions
Soursop juice
  1. Blend the soursop in 1½ qrt of water. Sieve and get rid of solids.
  2. Add sugar to taste, add ice and serve.

Tamarind juice
  1. Soak the tamarind in 1½ qrt of water overnight.
  2. Using a fork try to mash the tamarind to extract the pulp.
  3. Sieve and get rid of solids.
  4. Add sugar to taste, add ice and serve.

Notes
Use equivalent amount of your favorite sweetener instead of sugar for a lo-carb, light version.

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