Yaniqueques (Fried Crispy Johnny Cake Tortillas)

Yaniqueques Recipe (Fried Crispy Johnny Cake Tortillas): These are delicious, cruchy, flaky, deep-fried fast food wonders, a must on a visit to Boca Chica.

What is a yaniqueque, and where did it come from?

You know what? there seems to be a lot of theories and quite the disagreement. One popular theory is that it came from the British West Indies and it is a corruption of the name Johnny Cakes, a dish with which it shares very little in common.

Yaniqueques Recipe (Fried Crispy Johnny Cake Tortillas): These are delicious, cruchy, flaky, deep-fried fast food wonders, a must on a visit to Boca Chica.

Other equally argued-for theories exists. But I am not a food historian and I am confortable accepting that the answers to these questions are not quite vital.

There are also several variations of the same dish throughout the island, to further complicate things. This is the yaniqueque as I know it.

Yaniqueques Recipe (Fried Crispy Johnny Cake Tortillas): These are delicious, cruchy, flaky, deep-fried fast food wonders, a must on a visit to Boca Chica.

These delicious, crunchy, flaky, deep-fried fast food wonders are a must-have on a visit to Boca Chica, the popular Dominican beach.

Aunt Clara

Yaniqueques Recipe (Fried Crispy Johnny Cake Tortillas)
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Yaniqueques Recipe (Fried Crispy Johnny Cake Tortillas): These are delicious, cruchy, flaky, deep-fried fast food wonders, a must on a visit to Boca Chica.
Author:
Serves: 6 yaniqueques (aprox)
Ingredients
  • 2 cups of all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon of baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon of salt
  • ¼ cup of water
  • 3 tablespoons of vegetable oil (soy, corn or canola) for the dough
  • 2 cups of vegetable oil (soy, corn or canola) (for frying)
  • 1 cup of flour for working the dough and sprinkling on the counter.
Instructions
  1. Mix the baking powder, salt and flour.
  2. Pour in water and the oil for the dough and mix in. Work the dough on a lightly floured surface until everything is well mixed, don't knead the dough (add some flour if it is too sticky or water if it is too dry).
  3. Let dough rest for an hour covered in plastic film.
  4. Extend with a rolling pin on a lightly floured surface until it is very thin, nearly transparent. The thinner it is, the crispier it will be. If the dough is sticking, dust with flour as it becomes necessary.
  5. Cut into circles and punch holes in them with a fork. If the circles are a bit misshapen when you lift them, don't worry, that's how they look when you buy from street vendors.
  6. Heat oil over medium heat. Fry the circles of dough until they turn golden brown, rest on a paper towel to absorb excess oil.
  7. Sprinkle with sea salt and serve.
Notes
Yaniqueques come in all sizes, from the LPs (those were some big disks which were popular before cassettes and CDs, for you whippersnappers) to little ones served with chocolate de agua for breakfast. Make yours in whichever size you like. I prever mine about 5" in diameter as they are easier to handle.

Comments

  1. Jaris

    ¿Los yaniqueques se pueden cocinar en el horno?
    Creo que recuerdo que mi vecina una vez los hizo al horno cuando yo estaba pequeña. Vi que ella hizo una bolita y le hizo una rasgadura para que abrieran. No estoy segura. Hace mucho tiempo.

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